Music Review: Kingdom Come
Posted on August 31, 2011 by

Hello everyone again. Its this time of the week for another worship album review. This week were going to go on a different approach and pick an album that is in style different but not in the heart or lyrics. The album we are going to review this week is the album, Kingdom Come by Elevation Church.

Just a quick bio about this band. They are a local worship band from Elevation Church from North Carolina. They have not really came out with alot of albums (with a grand total of only 3 albums) and are not very well known in the Christian Music Industry. They are clearly something different, with their use of synthesizers, keys and guitar they really did create a great album. This album does not really have alot of fast songs and tends to stay on the mid-tempo/worship side of music. With tracks like, Kingdom Come, where they talk about “raising a joyful noise and singing unto the King Of Glory” to tracks like, This City is Yours, which talks about “teaching us to love the way You loved us” and makes the bold declaration to “send us out, send us out”. The overall theme of this album I would say would be about reaching the lost and broken, going out to the world, to the places others will not go and share Gods love towards them.

One of the great standout tracks is the song “Give Me Faith”. I personally like the YouTube version of it as it starts off with the bridge which declares: “I may be weak, but your Spirit’s strong in me. My flesh may fail, my God you never will!”

Overall this is a pretty good album. Due to the overdubbing from all the loops and synthesizers I would say alot of this songs would be hard to play for a congregation but the songs that are more “simpler” as in, Give Me Faith” or tracks like: “Mercy Reigns” or “This City is Yours” would probably be automatic favorites to the average congregation. This album would probably be best for use during your devotional time or when you need some music to play while you are playing.

To purchase:
iTunes

As always, if you have any recommendations or suggestions please feel free to email me at citylightschurchmusic@gmail.com

~Daniel

P.S. Also as a bonus I decided to add a video of them doing the song “When You Were Young” by the Killers, enjoy!

Our Story: “When You Were Young” from Elevation Church on Vimeo.

If you are surprised at them doing a “secular” song, here is their reasoning behind it:

“The worship of God isn’t something to be casual about, so I think we should all question why we do certain things, why we sing, or play, or demonstrate particular songs from our platform.

For us, there’s a couple of reasons behind us singing a “secular” song in our worship experiences. We’ll do it because…

1) That song has certain undeniable Truths in it that could be communicated on a different level or may connect in a different way with the congregation than a “worship” song. All Truth is God’s Truth, whether it’s sung in a “worship” song or sung on your local pop radio station.

2) Our church’s vision and mission is to reach those who are far from God, so they’ll be filled with life in Christ. That being the case, we see hundreds of unbelievers step through our doors each week because of being invited or curiosity or whatever the case may be. There’s no doubting that God’s brought them there for a purpose. And if they’re not used to going to church, and we play a song that they’ve heard elsewhere, then hopefully, it lets down their guard a little. This by no means replaces the passionate worship of Jesus, and pointing to him through our “worship” songs or “worship” set. We make no apologies for our passionate pursuit of Jesus during our worship experiences, or tone down our excitement for what He’s up to here or what He’s done in our lives because we know lifting Him up and putting him on display is what He asks of us, and He’ll take care of drawing people to Himself. But we still feel like He calls us to be creative in how we approach designing the worship experiences here. And sometimes that looks like singing a “secular” song.”

Comments are closed.